Residential Conveyancing Solicitors

Your Residential Conveyancing Solicitors

Cunningtons LLP

Your Residential Conveyancing Solicitors

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Residential Conveyancing Services:

Your Residential Conveyancing Solicitors

Buying and selling your home is not only stressful and time-consuming, it can also be a real worry when you read horror stories in the news about the process going wrong. As your home is probably the most expensive thing you will ever own, you don’t want to take any chances with it.

To look after you and your family’s home you need to use a professional property solicitor you can rely on, one with decades of experience in getting the process right, and with plenty of positive reviews from satisfied customers. And one you can communicate with easily.

Cunningtons solicitors’ award-winning customer service means that our clients know that they are in safe hands. Whether you are buying your first home or are investing for your future your Cunningtons property specialist will guide you through the process.

As well as dealing with the sale and purchase of residential property we can offer expert advice and assistance on remortgaging, home equity release loans, transfers of equity, leasehold extensions, leasehold enfranchisements and tenancy agreements.

Cunningtons conveyancing solicitors have branches around England, so you do not have to deal with a faceless call centre – you call your own legal representative direct, or you can also pop in and speak to us face-to-face in your local branch.

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Residential Conveyancing Services

Cunningtons are market leaders in Residential Conveyancing, dealing with several thousand property transactions each year.

Frequently Asked Questions

The following are common questions we get asked about buying and selling your home. If you cannot find the answer here, please contact us for an answer.

You should find a solicitor to act for you in your property sale or purchase as early as possible: you don’t need to wait until you’ve had an offer or found a new home to get the ball rolling.

After you have gone through our quotation system and signed our instruction form, if you’re selling you’ll need to let us have any deeds you hold and guarantees and other certificates. Providing your ID documents at an early stage always helps, and if you’re buying, evidence of the source of your funds.

The price of the conveyancing process depends on the value of the houses being bought or sold. You can contact our dedicated free phone quote line (0800 977 7887 to get an accurate quotation, or submit an enquiry via our website.

There are two key events in the sale of a property in the UK – ‘exchange’ and ‘completion’. The ‘exchange of contracts’ happens when both parties sign a legal contract and their legal representatives agree the terms and date the Contract that makes all aspects of the purchase legally binding and enforceable. ‘Completion’ is the final stage in the sale of a property, when property legally changes ownership.

The information from a property search is vital to a buyer. You need to know, for example, if the area is about to be extensively developed as that would be highly disruptive in terms of resulting traffic and noise levels.

Difficulties can arise when there are disputes as to title (ownership) of any part of the property, with alterations if the property is a listed building, lack of landlords consent for alterations to flats, or with a failure to have planning permission for changes to a property.

Additional ‘disbursements’ are merely payments to 3rd parties such as to local authorities for search fees and to the Land Registry for title deeds.

The average freehold transaction which proceeds without undue delay from lenders or local authorities in processing search requests, can usually take around 6 to 10 weeks from receipt of papers, leasehold transactions usually take longer due to the more complicated nature of the title and maintenance arrangements.

Yes, the VAT is added to your final bill once the sale or purchase has been exchanged.

Conveyancing is the legal process of transferring property, and it happens whenever UK property is bought, sold or remortgaged.

The conveyancing process for each transaction is different, and generally involves liaising between buyers, sellers, mortgage companies, local councils and the Land Registry.

If you are buying property:

We contact the seller’s solicitors to check the title deeds and contract, then conduct a variety of searches depending on the location, check the formal mortgage offer, collect together documents that require signing, organise the handing over the deposit, ensure all monies are in the right accounts, arrange completion of sale, ensure the correct stamp duty is paid, instruct the land registry of the change in ownership, then send the deeds to either the buyer or the mortgage lender.

If you are selling property:

We obtain the title deeds and up-to-date information from the Land Registry, arrange the contracts that outline the sale, liaise with the buyer’s solicitors, find out the balance on your mortgage if necessary, send deeds for signing, arrange for estate agents’ fees to be paid, collect all funds due to the seller, submit statements and send dees and keys to the new owner.

If you are remortgaging:

We obtain the title deeds and up-to-date title copy from Land Registry, deal with any searches, receive mortgage offer, ask you to sign mortgage deed, arrange for the delivery of the new loan, get up-to-date statement from current lender, run searches at the Land Registry, receive the loan and repay existing mortgage, and register the new mortgage with the Land Registry.

In brief, conveyancing has a number of stages and differs according to the purpose of the transaction, the finances of the buyer/seller/remortgager, the geographical location of the property, and the number of other transactions in the chain.

Talk to your conveyancing solicitor throughout the process and they’ll keep you up to date with this important process.

conveyancer solicitor is regulated by the Solicitors’ Regulation Authority (SRA), is a member of the Law Society, will have degree-level qualifications and at least two years on the job training before qualifying.

Whereas a conveyancer tends to be regulated by the Council for Licenced Conveyancers (CLC) and is usually less qualified, although can still be perfectly competent.

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Further Information

Buying A Home

To help you understand the process of buying your home, we have detailed the usual steps completed by the various parties involved.

Download our Guide to Buying

Jargon Buster

There’s a lot of jargon involved in the world of conveyancing, so we have put together a list of the most common terms, with explanations.

Find out more

Search Choices

Part of the conveyancing process involves ‘searches’. We cover your choices in this area, and what they mean for you.

Find out more

Residential Conveyancing Relevant Articles

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